Born of the stars, fallen to my demise, surviving.

lindahall:

Elizabeth Gould - Scientist of the Day

Elizabeth Gould, an English artist, was born July 18, 1804. In 1829, she married John Gould, an up-and-coming ornithologist, and Elizabeth immediately became the official family draughtswoman, finishing John’s rough drawings and executing the lithographs for the Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains (1830-32), and The Birds of Europe (1833-37). Although John gave Elizabeth full artistic credit in the Century, he became increasingly reluctant to share the limelight in later publications, so that, for example, Elizabeth receives almost no acknowledgement in the bird volume of Darwin’s Zoology of the Beagle (1841), although she did all the drawings and lithographs.

Elizabeth went to Australia with John in 1838 (leaving her 3 youngest children behind) and spent two years there, capturing the local birds and mammals on paper. John and Elizabeth returned to England in 1840, but sadly, Elizabeth died of puerperal fever in 1841, after giving birth to their eighth child. She was only 37 years old. All of her Australian paintings were lithographed and eventually published in such volumes as The Mammals of Australia (1863), but she received no credit at all for these posthumous publications.

The images show the crimson horned pheasant from Century of Birds, the blue roller from Birds of Europe, and the cactus finch from the Zoology of the Beagle,as well as a portrait of Elizabeth in a private collection.

Elizabeth was one of 12 women artists featured in the Library’s 2005 exhibition, Women’s Work. All of the volumes mentioned here are in the Library’s History of Science Collection.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Reblogged from humansofnewyork  7,197 notes
humansofnewyork:

"I’m writing a play about the nature of truth, and how difficult it is to convey the truth when everybody is speaking a different language. For example, the word ‘terrorist’ and the word ‘freedom fighter’ are used to refer to the exact same people at the exact same time. With everyone speaking differently, truth is almost impossible to agree upon. Yet believing in the existence of truth is the only thing that keeps us from devolving into tribal warfare. Because without the existence of truth, the person who is most powerful becomes the person who is right."

humansofnewyork:

"I’m writing a play about the nature of truth, and how difficult it is to convey the truth when everybody is speaking a different language. For example, the word ‘terrorist’ and the word ‘freedom fighter’ are used to refer to the exact same people at the exact same time. With everyone speaking differently, truth is almost impossible to agree upon. Yet believing in the existence of truth is the only thing that keeps us from devolving into tribal warfare. Because without the existence of truth, the person who is most powerful becomes the person who is right."

Reblogged from truebluemeandyou  196 notes
truebluemeandyou:

DIY 9 Favorite Leather or Pleather Projects Posted on truebluemeandyou. Part 1. Many of these are high-end DIYs and range from beginner to advanced (#5).
Leather Studded Horse Clutch from Fashionrolla. inspiration & realisation posted on FB an expensive unicorn bag that looked like this one.
Knockoff Dion Lee 3D Filter Jacket Tutorial from Deconstrut. One of my favorite fashion DIYs.
Print and Iron On Images to Leather from Lana Red.
Leather/Pleather Pleated Bracelet from Fashionrolla. No Clasp needed.
*Vlieger & Vandam Inspired Guardian Angel Leather Clutch from Passions for Fashion. One of the best high-end DIYs ever.
Easy Hermès Knockoff Faux Knot Cuff from inspiration & realisation.
Leather Animal Keyschain Tutorial and Template from Between the Lines.
Louis Vuitton Inspired Jelly Bag Tutorial and Template from Make My Lemonade.
Roundup of Miniature Leather Books.